Avicularia
Born to be Vile

It’s fitting that this Croatian band take their name from a genus of spider that includes Tarantulas, because their form of spazzy, angular, technical , slightly experimental death metal is the perfect soundtrack for a nature documentary where spiders do their skittish, frantic, unpredictable, spidery things.

The twisting, twangy form of death metal that Avicularia play is exceedingly well done for an essentially a unsigned eastern European act. The production values are robust yet polished, the musicianship is top notch (notably the drumming of Kresamir Lovric) and the 8 tracks that make up Born to be Vile match up well with any of 2009s tech death metal releases, but has a little character of its own.

After the relatively mellow “Intro”, complete with Event Horizon sample, I’m reminded slightly of a less cosmic, less progressive version of Mithras as “Anthem to Arms” staggers into view with a ample mix of scattershot, jittery polyrhythms and burly grooves and some esoteric solos work. “Confrontation” heaves and shudders with complex abandon while the short chaotic stab of instrumental “Stand By Me” give way to the eight minute title track, where the bands very slight experimental side, surface briefly by way of some synths and some simply stunning stop/starts and time changes, including a huge loping couple of minutes.

The band’s cited influences such as Cryptopsy, Necrophagist and Gorguts (Aviculraa do have a very “Canadian” feel to them) are readily apparent as the final trio of tracks closes out the album. The savage stab of “Succubus”, yet more Event Horizon samples for the free form jazzy savagery of “Spiraling Doom” and the album’s epic, magnificent ten minute closer, “Requiem for Ego”, where angelic choirs introduce an utter maelstrom of death metal complexity and competence for the tracks entirety including flamenco flourishes, dreamy synths, blistering blast beats huge lurches and even a haunting cello closing.

Even with such a great year for technical death metal, anyone who has enjoyed the likes of Obscura, Gorguts, Vengeful and other slightly more forward thinking death metal should definitely check out this very promising, very skilled band that should be getting the attention of labels shortly (if there is any sense in the world).

[Visit the band's website]
Written by Erik T
December 7th, 2009

Comments

  1. Commented by: Mars

    Exellent avantgarde death metal. Nice review.


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