Sulphur Aeon
Swallowed By the Ocean's Tide

They say good things come to those who wait. Well, in the case of the debut from Germany’s Sulphur Aeon, that is most certainly true. Originally released at the beginning of the year/late 2012 on Imperium Productions then licensed via FDA Rekotz, I finally ordered the album after months of waiting, forgetting, and looking on all of the online distros, and eventually committing to one of the most talked about death metal albums of early 2013. Boy was it worth it.

Sulphur Aeon‘s style of death metal is multifaceted. Though their lyrics and themes focus on Cthlulu/Lovecraftian mythos, their chosen style isn’t quite so cornered. While much of Lovecraftin based metal is steeped in the more unsettling side of metal such as oozing doom or cavernous, atonal death metal, Sulphor Aeon‘s sound is one that pulls from many tenets of death death; Immolation, old school Swedish death metal and even melodic death metal (I imagine in part to members involvement with melodic death/black metal act December Flower). The end result of churning but still structured and memorable death metal that results in something akin to the likes of Immolation, Maveth or Vorum‘s robust imposing chaos crossed with the melodic clarity of Amon Amarth.

Some may decry the Amon Amarth analogy, but just listen to the crisp melodic solos and rousing percussive marches that litter the otherwise murky, muddy likes of standout opener (after intro “Cthulu “Rites”) “Incantation”, “The Devil’s Gorge” or “From the Stars to the Sea”. But for the most part, Sulphur Aeon deliver a blistering, well crafted and intense collection of death metal. From the ferocious “Where Black Ships Sail”, the pummeling “Those Who Dwell in Stellar Void”, to the filthy regal march of the title track, every song is engaging and thrilling in the ability to mix these immense, cavernous, tentacled moments and pristine moments of surprising melodic clarity. There isn’t a single wasted note or riff on the entire album as it enthralls for its full 47 minutes. And while the mix overall is a bit lagging, it fits in the scheme of things and the themes, but I wish the guitars had a bit more polish and punch as they are a bit mushy when just delivering riffs. However, things perk up for the solos and more singled out moments.

The album closes with a cover of Fulchi movie composer Fabio Frizzi’s’ “Zombi” composition, showing yet another aspect of the band’s large arsenal of influences that has resulted in arguably one of 2013’s most impressive and exciting death metal releases. With this and the likes of ADE, Krypts, Lantern, Abyssal and others in 2013 already, the future of death metal appears to be in some very capable hands and offering some truly exiting new bands for the foreseeable future.

[Visit the band's website]
Written by E. Thomas
July 19th, 2013

Comments

  1. Commented by: Nick Taxidermy

    this band is awesome.


  2. Commented by: Iwein

    Well written and to the point. I love this album. And ‘zombi’ gives me goosebumps again and again.


  3. Commented by: Stiffy

    Need to hear this. I’ve been neglecting it


  4. Commented by: Stiffy

    Plus…best artwork this year


  5. Commented by: Scott Alisoglu

    VERY well done!


  6. Commented by: Duma

    I purchased this album on the strength of this review.
    Some of the best DM I’ve heard.
    Brilliant album.


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